8 JUN 2022

What percentage of European content do streaming platforms have?

Netflix is now at or above 30% European content in nearly all of its major European markets measured on a proportion of titles in catalogue, Ampere Analysis noted in its latest report.

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Netflix is now at or above 30% European content in nearly all of its major European markets measured on a proportion of titles in catalogue, Ampere Analysis noted in its latest report. The notable exception is the UK and Ireland, where 27% of titles are European. France is also slightly under, as are minor markets Belgium and Switzerland.

“With European 30% quota regulations for streamers already being introduced in a number of markets, Netflix is now just a 'rounding error' away from meeting requirements across its entire European footprint,”  commented Guy Bisson, Research Director at Ampere Analysis and the author of the report.

The shift to hit quota is recent. In December 2021, 16 of the 27 markets analyzed were under 30% European. Even in the UK, Netflix will hit 30% European with the addition of just 408 European titles (or the removal of 953 non-European). Even fewer would be required for France, Belgium and Switzerland to meet quota.

Netflix is not alone in ramping up the proportion of its content that is European. While the company is ahead of its global streaming rivals in programming European content, Prime Video also exceeds the 30% quota in Germany, Switzerland and Italy, and is on a par with Netflix in the UK with 27% of catalogue titles being of European origin. Other Prime Video markets range from 16% to 28% European.

HBO Max also has a large proportion of European titles in its local catalogues, with the majority of its European footprint already exceeding 25% European. Disney+ still has some way to go, hovering around the 10% European mark. But like other studio and global streamers, Disney+ has recently been ramping up its European local original production activities.

“The change can be viewed from two sides of the fence in terms of success. It either reflects the benefits of regulatory pressure in boosting the acquisition and production of European film and TV by US-based players operating in the region, or it shows how global players are increasingly competing directly with local and regional players with content that was hitherto largely the stronghold of single-market local broadcasters,”  Bisson added.